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Complying with the NIH Public Access Policy  

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Public Access Policy became law in January 2008 (effective on April 7, 2008). This guides outlines the four steps for compliance as well as incorporates frequently asked questions and other helpful resources.
Last Updated: Apr 19, 2011 URL: http://libguides.library.coh.org/nih_pap Print Guide RSS Updates

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Scholarly Communication Librarian

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Andrea Lynch, MLIS
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Lee Graff Medical & Scientific Library
626-301-8497 (x60520)
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Past & Present Learning Opportunities

The session will include a 45-minute presentation with 15 minutes for questions and/or discussion, and cover the following four steps for complying with the policy:

  • Determine applicability — determine which papers fall under the policy
  • Retain copyright — read the journal publisher’s copyright transfer agreement to make sure you’re able to comply with the policy and deposit the paper to PubMed Central
  • Submit your paper to PubMed Central — there are a number of methods to do this; when the publisher doesn’t do this for free, the library can do it for you
  • Cite using PMCIDs — in biosketches, progress reports, and applications, incorporate the PubMed Central ID into the citations of applicable papers authored by you or that come from your NIH-funded projects
     

    Complying with the NIH Public Access Policy

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Public Access Policy became law in January 2008. The law states:

    The Director of the National Institutes of Health shall require that all investigators funded by the NIH submit or have submitted for them to the National Library of Medicine’s PubMed Central an electronic version of their final, peer-reviewed manuscripts upon acceptance for publication, to be made publicly available no later than 12 months after the official date of publication: Provided, That the NIH shall implement the public access policy in a manner consistent with copyright law.

    Benefits of the NIH Public Access Policy

    • makes freely availble taxpayer-funded research;
    • advances science; and
    • improves health.

    This guide outlines the necessary four steps for compliance as well as incorporates frequently asked questions and other helpful resources to help you get familiar with the NIH Public Access Policy.

    1. Determine applicability
    2. Address copyright
    3. Submit to PubMed Central
    4. Cite appropriately

    For questions and/or help with compliance, please don't hesitate to contact Andrea Lynch (alynch@coh.org; x60520; or use the contact box to the left), Scholarly Communication Librarian, at the Lee Graff Medical & Scientific Library.

     

    PubMed and PubMed Central: The Difference between a PMID and PMCID

    The PubMed Central identifier or reference number (PMCID) is different from the PubMed identifier or reference number (PMID). PubMed Central is an index of full-text papers, while PubMed is an index of paper abstracts. The PMCID links to full-text papers in PubMed Central, while the PMID links to abstracts in PubMed.

    PMID to PMCID Converter Tool

    What resources do you use for NIH Public Access Policy compliance?

    We'd like to know what Web pages, online videos, or blogs you've used to get familiar with the NIH Public Access Policy. Please share them below by clicking on "Submit a link."

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